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Media Reviews

DIRTY & BEAUTIFUL – Acousticmusic.com

Among a number of rather startling virtues in Dirty & Beautiful, Vol. 1 by rising fusion skinsman Gary Husband is the almost beatific fact that Jan Hammer is back in his old pre-Miami Vice form…just for a single track, true, but breathtaking in its chopsmanship harking to the old Mahavishnu Orchestra / Billy Cobham / John Abercrombie era when the guy was hands-down one of the absolute best there was.  more…

DIRTY & BEAUTIFUL – All About Jazz (Patterson)

It’s almost a shame that Gary Husband’s follow-up to the excellent Hotwired (Abstract Logix, 2009) did not take that exciting young ensemble to the next stage, were it not for the fact that Dirty & Beautiful brings together an exceptional line-up of some of the most innovative and influential musicians of the last forty years… more…

DIRTY & BEAUTIFUL – Jazz Review

Gary Husband is a musical renaissance man.  A ferocious progressive-rock and jazz drummer, he also handles the keyboard duties here and for guitar titan, John McLaughlin’s 4th Dimension band.  This outing provides a glimpse of prominent artists he has performed with over the years.  Subsequently, the program signifies the first time McLaughlin and guitarist Allan Holdsworth appear on the same album.  more…

DIRTY & BEAUTIFUL – All About Jazz (Kelman)

Throughout, Husband is a multiple threat: a drummer capable of laying a meaty groove while, at the same time, ratcheting up the energy level with his interpretive interaction; a keyboardist who delivers finely honed melodism as much as expansively textured landscapes; and a broad-reaching writer, from the Zawinul-esque “Bedford Falls” to the brooding “Boulevard Baloneyo,” an alternate version of which is included as a bonus track on the Japanese edition. more…

HOTWIRED – All About Jazz

Renowned as a fusion drummer with few peers, Husband’s stick work in this acoustic quartet is a revelation, and outstanding throughout … It is hard to pick out highlights from such uniformly strong pieces … A wonderful debut recording.

HOTWIRED – Jazz UK

When drummer/pianist Gary Husband’s Drive first appeared in 2007, this writer was fortunate enough to catch it at London’s Vortex, and came away convinced it would become one of the UK scene’s big deals – a dramatic combination of the succinct power and tautness of late ’60s Miles Davis music and post-Ornette freebop, all driven by Husband’s unique mix of rock energy and jazz grooves. more…

HOTWIRED – Jazz Review

Drummer/keyboardist Gary Husband is a familiar name to jazz-rock and jazz-fusion aficionados, given his work with guitar gods, Allan Holdsworth and John McLaughlin among many others of note.  He’s also performed with Gongzilla and supported bassist/vocalist Jack Bruce and guitarist Robin Trower on the superfine 2008 blues-shaded rock release titled Seven Moons, as the list goes on. more…

HOTWIRED – This Is London Magazine

For some reason, UK pianist-drummer-composer Gary Husband seldom receives his critical due here, despite moving in the same exalted circles as drummer Billy Cobham and guitarist John McLaughlin.  Gary’s latest album, featuring volatile saxman Julian Siegel, brassy trumpet discovery Richard Turner and US bassist Mike Janisch, is a typically original, impassioned and hard-swinging piece of work. What more does he have to do?

HOTWIRED – Downbeat Magazine

Whether playing synths with McLaughlin and Billy Cobham or releasing solo piano recordings, Husband has shown himself to be a man capable of reinvention.  Hotwired debuts Husband’s visceral straight ahead quartet Drive and the results are stellar. Britain’s finest typically do their homework, everyone from Tubby Hayes to Iain Bellamy proving jazz is a universal language; here, the giant sized Husband joins their ranks.

HOTWIRED – Jazzwise Magazine

It’s been a long time coming, but Husband has finally released his debut as the drumming leader of a band and the wait is most definitely worth it. From the opening Blakey-esque explosion that sets off “The Defender” you know this is an album touched by no little magic.  It helps that Husband has gathered a band around him that reflects so many of his own charismatic virtues … Read no more. Just buy it.